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20120925
20121003
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falling at a bond auction today. analysts say the auction shows nand for italian government paper remains healthy. and eu regulators are prepare to go charge microsoft for failing to comply with a 2009 ruling. that ruling had on ordered the company to offer user as choice of web browsers. apparently they may not have done that. if guilty, microsoft could face fines of up to 10% of its global revenues. and that would be a lot of money. >> iran still, we're this close to nuclear -- think our unfunded labels are like 60 trillion or something. europe back in the crapper, but the refs. huh? >> i told you, i don't always like unions. i'm actually happy that the refs union won. >> it does provide a release from some of the travails and the worries of every day life. spoorts is sports is an escape. >> they said they will be back on the field tonight. >> i think the regular refs had a deal with the foot locker guy. >> did you see the story of the guy who actually made that call? he's a bank of america full-time banker. so you're a banker, a fill-in ref. the only way you could probably be less popu
they need nearly 60 billion euros more to expand the shock. the same time, the spanish government has said that the extra aid would push its budget deficit 7.4% of gdp in 2012, which is above the eu's target. so i don't know how she moves around so quickly from place to place, but from athens to madrid, here is julia. >> thanks very much, ross. you just have to bear with me if i make another freudian slip on greece versus spain. but right now, what we heard from the government over the weekend was that their deficit will be on target at 6.3%. but if you include the bank aid as you mentioned, 7.4%. they did make great pains to point out that european commission officials have not asked them to make any adjustments to reduce that number, but the question has to be asked what happens if they don't meet the deficit target of 6.3%. many analysts are expecting them to come in around 7% in terms of the target for this year. day take last week actually showed that the central government deficit came in just around 4.3% up to august. how, the full year target is 4.5% and then we're not even bringin
. workers are protesting the government's austerity measures. government officials submitted a draft of the 2013 budget yesterday that calls for a new wave of deep cuts which will save $10 billion next year. workers will protest proposed cuts to salaries, pensions and other benefits. last week, 50,000 people in athens demonstrated against austerity. wages in china are going up - by some estimates, about 17% a year. it is providing china's growing middle class with more money to buy goods, though inflation is not helping. but it may also drive up the cost of making some of those products there, as well. in our cover story, who gains as china's employee base moves up? despite china's present economic slowdown, the story of its workforce recently has been of migration from farm to factory. 25 million made the move in 1990. last year, that figure grew to 158 million. it has increased china's productivity and competitiveness. but lately, that workforce is demanding more. "they increasingly learn that there's a big gap in what they earn and some other people." the wage gap in narrowing. tw
solutions, and people lost confidence that the government knew what it was doing. they let one fail, they'd bail out another one, they'd let another one fail, back and forth. what's the policy? and so i think the crisis was terribly mishandled by secretary paulson is and the others involved in it. cheryl: i will say oneover the things, william, that he did do and, frankly, i've been on the air saying i thought it was the right move, letting lehman go, almost making that example of lehman brothers, putting the banks on notice, we're not going to be downtown at the new york fed negotiating last minute deals on sunday nights to save your behinds, basically. that was a pretty bold move by paulson. you wouldn't have done that same move that he made five years ago in. >> no, i think that when you're, when you have a crisis, the first obligation the government has is to calm the crisis, do whatever it takes to calm the crisis. and that's what we did in the 1980s. i would tell you, cheryl, the 1980s was far more threatening to the financial system and the economy than this episode in 2008. we act
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4